Index Insurance Forum

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26
Nov
The Conference will focus on how agricultural insurance and food security are linked and how this link is relevant for future development efforts. It will sharpen the understanding under what circumstances and how agricultural insurance can best contribute to food security and provides a platform to share experiences. The Conference welcomes food security and agricultural insurance experts, development organizations, insurance policy makers and regulators, academia and representatives from the private sector. View AIC 2014 panelist interviews here .
Jackson Kahiga, a small scale Kenyan farmer, talks about his exprience with Index Insurance
Agricultural insurance plays an important role in stabilising farmers’ income and stimulating investment in agriculture. The market for these products has taken off since the Chinese government began to subsidise premiums. Challenges remain, however, and reinsurance can help support the industry with know-how and capacity.
This paper examines climate change mitigation and adaptation from an insurance industry perspective, with particular reference to London and the USA. It illustrates how British insurers are increasingly shaping public policy and using new technology to manage the risks from climate change impacts and makes a plea for society to make more use of insurance expertise in future decision making. The industry is a “sleeping giant” much bigger and potentially more powerful than the fossil fuel industry in shaping the future through financial incentives and disincentives. The insurance industry has much to contribute, and increasingly would welcome a greater dialogue with the academic and political community. The paper has a “further reading” section, which includes two recent UN reports which illustrate the need for greater dialogue between experts in the USA and the UK. Hopefully this conference will help to create such a dialogue.
52% of the population in Haiti lives in rural areas. However, Haitian agriculture historically remained unprofitable and financial credit to agriculture represents less than 1% of the total loan portfolio of banks. As a consequence, 60% of the food consumed in Haiti is imported. Agricultural production is severely affected by natural catastrophes such as excessive rain, hurricane strength winds, and droughts.
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